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Chiropractic Care | Lewiston, ID | Joan P. Burrow DC NMD


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Studies Find High Fructose Corn Syrup Contains Mercury

Need another reason to dislike High Fructose Corn Syrup? We’ve found one.

Studies have found that High Fructose Corn Syrup is contaminated with mercury and made with toxic chemical catalyst that can burn a hole in your stomach. Here are a few articles that give more information:

The Washington Post

“Almost half of tested samples of commercial high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contained mercury, which was also found in nearly a third of 55 popular brand-name food and beverage products where HFCS is the first- or second-highest labeled ingredient, according to two new U.S. studies.”

“Mercury is toxic in all its forms. Given how much high-fructose corn syrup is consumed by children, it could be a significant additional source of mercury never before considered.”

To read this article Click Here

 

WebMD.com

“Overall, we found detectable mercury in 17 of 55 samples, or around 31%,”

“Mercury exposure at high levels can harm the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, and immune system. A form of mercury called methylmercury is particularly risky to a baby’s developing brain and nervous system, according to background information from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).”

To read this article Click Here

 

Natural News

“Beyond the link to detrimental health effects, another danger from this ubiquitous ingredient comes from the toxic chemicals that are used to turn corn into corn starch and then finally into HFCS. One of these chemicals, glutaraldehyde, is a toxic chemical used in industrial water treatment systems and to sterilize medical equipment by killing living cells. It’s also a well-known embalming chemical. It is toxic to the human body and causes eye, nose, throat and lung irritation (asthma, sneezing, wheezing, burning eyes, etc.). It can also cause drowsiness, dizziness and headaches. (http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/glutaraldehy…)”

“The bottom line? If you love eating a highly-refined liquid sugar made with the use of hazardous chemicals and often contaminated with brain-damaging mercury, eat more high fructose corn syrup!”

To read this article Click Here


1 Comment

Neck pain?

Annals of Internal Medicine published the results of a randomized controlled trial comparing Manual Therapy, Physical Therapy, or Continued Care by a General Practitioner for Patients with Neck Pain in 2002:

Neck pain is a common problem in the general population, with point prevalences between 10% and 15% (1–3). It is most common at approximately 50 years of age and is more common in women than in men (1, 2, 4–6). Neck pain can be severely disabling and costly, and little is known about its clinical course (7–9). Limited range of motion and a subjective feeling of stiffness may accompany neck pain, which is often precipitated or aggravated by neck movements or sustained neck postures. Headache, brachialgia, dizziness, and other signs and symptoms may also be present in combination with neck pain (10, 11). Although history taking and diagnostic examination can suggest a potential cause, in most cases the pathologic basis for neck pain is unclear and the pain is labeled nonspecific. Conservative treatment methods that are frequently used in general practice include analgesics, rest, or referral to a physical therapist or manual therapist (12, 13). Physical therapy may include passive treatment, such as
massage, interferential current, or heat applications, and active treatment, such as exercise therapies. . .

Results: At 7 weeks, the success rates were 68.3% for manual therapy, 50.8% for physical therapy, and 35.9% for continued care. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity with manual therapy compared with continued care or physical therapy ranged from 0.9 to 1.5 on a scale of 0 to 10. Disability scores also favored manual therapy, but the differences among groups were small. Manual therapy scored consistently better than the other two interventions on most outcome measures. Physical therapy scored better than continued care on some outcome measures, but the differences were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: In daily practice, manual therapy is a favorable treatment option for patients with neck pain compared with physical therapy or continued care by a general practitioner.

Find the entire paper at http://www.annals.org

Ann Intern Med. 2002;136:713-722.